Eliot Rothwell


Eliot is a freelance football writer who has covered football from England, Russia, Turkey and Ukraine for the Daily Mirror, ESPN FC, Roads & Kingdoms, BBC Radio 5 Live, talkSPORT, and others.
  • Kelechi Iheanacho’s Stagnation Shows Manchester City’s Cluttered Pathways

    In recent years, the language of marketing and public relations has bled into football discourse. It had always been there in the background, erupting onto the surface with the announcement of a new sponsorship deal or kit launch, but now it has begun to influence the way we talk about footballers and the game that they play. Tactical ideas have become “philosophy”, dealings on the transfer market fall under “recruitment” and young players being given a chance in the first-team represents a “pathway”. ...

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  • The Champions League’s Preliminary Rounds Are Its Most Romantic

    The Champions League is undoubtedly the best club competition in football. Each season, Europe’s best, and often most historic teams play each other in some of the continent’s most evocative cities. Fans are blessed with the opportunity to see the world’s best players compete for one of its grandest prizes. Regularly, the competition provides world football with some of its most memorable matches, goals and performances. ...

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  • The Confederations Cup To Play Out In The Shadow Of Russian Dysfunction

    On Monday, just five days before Russia open the Confederations Cup against New Zealand, protests spread throughout Russia’s cities. Residents of vastly separate areas of the north, east, south and west gathered in town and city squares to voice their displeasure with corruption in the country. The protests were most forceful in Moscow and St Petersburg, both Confederations Cup host cities, but spread elsewhere, including Kazan, which will host one of the semi-finals. ...

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  • Jack Wilshere’s Star Continues To Dim

    Just over a year ago, Roy Hodgson, the England manager, met up with Ray Lewington and Gary Neville, his two most senior coaches. The three men gathered to discuss their final squad selections for Euro 2016. Most of the decisions had already been made, leaving just a few final deliberations. One of the worries was Jack Wilshere, who had played through just six minutes of first-team action that season. But Hodgson was adamant that Wilshere should be included; he remembered performances against Switzerland and Slovenia. Hodgson got his wish and Wilshere went to Euro 2016, playing three games, including much of the defeat to Iceland. A little after Euro 2016, Wilshere’s fortunes worsened. Hodgson had seen the midfielder as a crucial component of how he wanted England to set up. Arsene Wenger, after many years, didn’t feel the same about Arsenal. Wilshere was told he could leave on loan, at least at first. AS Roma and AC Milan were both thought to be interested but, to the surprise of many, Wilshere decided to spend a year with AFC Bournemouth. Many saw it as a coup for Eddie Howe’s side. ...

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  • David Luiz And Per Mertesacker Should Not Just Have Their Performances Attributed To Tactical Systems

    The 2016-17 season produced a lot of things for the hour-long highlight packages. The new managers, big players, title winners and relegation strugglers will each have their place in the immediate story. The first seasons for Antonio Conte, Pep Guardiola and Jose Mourinho may come to be seen in different lights with the passing of time and the future development of their sides. But the one, lasting change already brought to the league this season is the three-man defence, now cemented as a viable tactical option for teams at the top and bottom of the league. ...

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